Show: March 4 - 7, 2019 | Exhibit March 5 - 7 | Atlanta, Georgia
Resource
    Read More: Hope You Like Our New Look
    November 13, 2018

    The mission of HAI is to help you keep the rotors turning. My fellow staff members and I come to work each day to make that happen. One way we do this is to produce a robust HAI communications program that informs, entertains, connects, and promotes the international civil helicopter community. This is why we produce ROTOR, ROTOR Daily, and the HAI website—and why we have instituted major changes in each.

    As you read this issue of ROTOR, you may have noticed its new design. But the changes are more than skin deep. In addition to choosing new paper, fonts, and logo, we have made a concerted effort to bring you more stories “from the field,” where the skids break ground contact and the rotors are turning.

    At the same time, we have updated our website, rotor.org, with advanced technology and a fresh new look. We want to provide you, our member or customer, with the most current, relevant information that will assist you in your day-to-day activities. We also wanted to create a website that you could navigate easily and find what you’re looking for. If you haven’t done so in a while, visit rotor.org. I think you’ll be pleased.

    Another of our publications is our daily e-newsletter, ROTOR Daily. This round-up of all of the day’s news for the international helicopter community is valuable reading for those in the vertical-lift business. You’ll also learn what HAI is doing to support our members and the industry. If you haven’t already, I strongly recommend that you subscribe, for free, to ROTOR Daily so you stay abreast of news that can affect you. Visit rotor.org/subscribe to sign up.

    Underpinning these recent changes is HAI’s new association management system. This complex software allows us to run many different processes, but it works best when the end user or customer (that’s you) never gives it a thought. While the upgrades to our database and related systems are important to us, it is mission critical that they provide you with the tools to easily manage your HAI membership, update your subscriptions, obtain safety information, register for HAI HELI-EXPO, or conduct any other business with HAI. This system also provides members with the opportunity to update their membership record to include every employee, so they too can access HAI publications, resources, and other benefits. 

    Now that we’ve upgraded the technology that connects us to you, we want to stay in touch. We want to hear from you, our members and customers. This interaction should be a two-way street, and I’d like HAI to do more listening. You don’t exist for us; we exist for you, to enhance your ability to operate safely, efficiently, and as part of an economically sustainable industry.

    Our effectiveness when we advocate on your behalf is enhanced when you share what’s happening in your operating environment. When you call about an issue with crash-resistant fuel tanks or want to recognize an extraordinary colleague with a Salute to Excellence nomination, we learn about conditions in the field. And if it’s important to you, then it’s important to us.

    I hope you find the changes we have made beneficial and relevant to your operations. I would sincerely appreciate it if you would let me know what you think of them—either way, positive or negative. Are we moving in the right direction to better serve your needs? Do you have any suggestions that would add further value for you?

    Send me your thoughts about our new look or anything else that’s on your mind. Let me know at tailrotor@aol.com. As always, fly safe, fly neighborly—and keep those rotors turning!

    Best Regards,

    Matt

    Read More: Get a Cardboard Box
    August 02, 2018

    We will get to why aviation professionals need a cardboard box in a minute.

    But first, did you ever think you would see our industry move away from the word helicopter? It appears we are morphing into the vertical-lift industry, unmanned vertical industry, or the vertical urban air-taxi industry, take your pick.

    I don’t disagree with this transformation. We are in an exciting time in our industry as different types of aircraft, such as drones, tiltrotors, and autonomous vehicles, come onto the civil market.

    HAI supports those who make, operate, fix, maintain, overhaul, or supply all vehicles, manned or unmanned, that can operate in the vertical-lift mode and perform that wonderful maneuver, the hover. As one of the old guys in this industry, I started out flying helicopters and I intend to go out flying an aircraft called a helicopter — but I know that word is no longer big enough to hold all the facets of our industry.

    In an effort to be more inclusive, HAI will look at changing our name to better reflect our membership, which includes those active in both manned and unmanned vertical-lift aviation. If you have any ideas on the potential rebranding of HAI, please let me know your thoughts.

    Now about that cardboard box.

    Many, many, many years ago, one of my mentors and I were discussing safety and corporate ethics. He noted that, regardless of the position you hold — owner, manager, pilot, maintenance technician, or customer — we are all part of the cultural team that controls safety and ethics. And yes, the two are closely related.

    My mentor’s ethical philosophy — and mine — can be summarized as “do the right thing.” To achieve the desired result of zero accidents, we must employ this attitude in our everyday risk assessment and decision-making, on every flight, on every job.

    To achieve zero accidents in our industry, we must acknowledge that we will not be able to transport every patient, meet the desires of every customer, ferry every corporate executive, or fly every tour flight or training session. When you believe that safety is being compromised, “I cannot safely do that and so I will not do that” is the only acceptable response.

    So how does the cardboard box come in?

    As the discussion with my mentor progressed, he told me, “Matt, at some time in your career, either as a line pilot, manager, or executive, there will come a time when you will be confronted with a situation that you know to be unsafe, not compliant with regulations, or unethical. This could be in connection with flight operations or even just everyday business operations.”

    When that happens, he said, “You need to hold your ground and do what you know to be the right thing. To do this successfully, you need to be able to remove from your decision-making the potential negative impacts of the decision on yourself, such as the possible loss of your job.”

    In our industry, we must go to work each day willing to accept negative consequences as a result of doing the right thing. If we cannot do this, then “doing the right thing” isn’t meaningful. “Doing the right thing … when it’s convenient” doesn’t have the same power.

    This sounds tough, but when you consider the potential of a flawed decision — the loss of lives in the aircraft or on the ground — it makes sense. Your objective is to do your job each day in a safe, professional manner. When you cannot do that, then speak up.

    “Also,” my mentor continued, “You need to get a cardboard box.”

    I told him, “I understand everything you’ve told me, and I agree. But what’s with the box?”

    He laughed and then explained. “The box is there so you can pack up your personal items before you walk out the door for the last time. Take it home, and then have dinner with your family and fly another day.”

    Since that conversation, I have had a cardboard box close to me, in view, to remind me of his advice and my obligation to those who put their trust and lives in our care. I suggest you get your own box. It may help you get through some tough days.

    Have I ever packed the box? That is another tale for another day.

    That’s my story and I am sticking to it. Let me know what you think at tailrotor@aol.com.

    As always, fly safe, fly neighborly — and keep those rotors turning!

    Best Regards,

    Matt

    Read More: Vietnam Pilots and Crew Members Come Home
    May 13, 2018

    Every once in a while, you have a perfect day. Not often, but when you do, it is something to behold.

    I was lucky enough to have such a day recently. It was at the dedication of a memorial at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. The monument was placed to recognize the Americans who lost their lives while serving as helicopter pilots and crew members in Vietnam.

    Trying to place a memorial in a government facility such as Arlington National Cemetery can be a frustrating, time-consuming, and constantly changing process. This effort was all of these things and then some.

    The good news is that the proponents of the monument, the Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Association, sustained the effort with their passion and commitment to ensure that their brothers-in-arms had a place to come home to. Their leadership and members provided the effort, sweat, and tears — and funds — that was needed to make it happen.

    And happen it did, on a sunny afternoon in April 2018, within the sacred grounds of Arlington National Cemetery. It is hard for many to truly appreciate such an event unless they were involved in the events commemorated by the memorial. This is true for the Vietnam experience as well as other past, present, and even future life-changing experiences involving armed conflict.

    As I looked around on that afternoon, it was apparent that those in attendance had made the journey from near and far, some needing the assistance of a cane, wheelchair, or loved one. All were filled with emotion, expectations, and personal thoughts.

    Some were hoping to meet up with long-lost friends, some were seeking a sense of closure. Others looked forward to finally coming home. Many just wanted their service to be acknowledged. No matter what their individual reason was for coming there, the lifelong bond between the veterans could only be understood among themselves.

    As I reflect on my own experience in Vietnam and the conversations over the years that I have had with other veterans, I choose not to focus on the horrors we witnessed, the politics of the situation, nor the lifelong baggage we carry. Instead I want to reflect on the subsequent good that comes from such events.

    We cannot help but remember the identification of Vietnam as the “helicopter” war. Many consider that war to be the period when the helicopter came into its own as a military tool. I like to think that the thousands of highly experienced pilots and crew members who returned from Vietnam helped the civilian helicopter industry reach its next level of advancement and maturity by applying the abilities of the helicopter realized in war to serve the greater good of society.

    We should never forget the many lives saved by our industry or the multitude of goods and services we deliver that enhance the lives of our neighbors every day. Of equal importance are the many skills and experiences gained by those of us who were trained in the military to fly and maintain these aircraft. Those skills helped us transition back to civilian life, giving us the ability to provide for ourselves and our families while serving the needs of our fellow men and women.

    Although the dedication of this memorial was focused on those who flew and crewed helicopters in Vietnam, we never want to forget all veterans and active-duty military, men and women alike, of allied nations who put themselves in harm’s way to keep us safe and able to enjoy the freedoms we have come to expect.

    In closing, I would note that one of the most personally gratifying things I have witnessed over these many years is a cultural change that has occurred in our society. It seems that we can now separate the politics of war from the patriotism and sacrifice of those who fight them on our behalf. Rather than the discomfort or outright hostility that many experienced upon their return from Vietnam, veterans now hear a simple acknowledgement of “Thank you for your service.”

    To the families, loved ones, and friends of all veterans, thank you for being there for us.

    To those veterans who joined me at Arlington National Cemetery, I say to you all: Thank you for your service. Welcome home. Be at peace.

    That’s my story and I am sticking to it. Let me know what you think at tailrotor@aol.com.

    As always, fly safe — fly neighborly!

    Best Regards,

    Matt